Tag Archive | Haiku

Meeting Point – Haibun

We wander in Al Seef Road, Dubai, taking in the exotic scents of Gum Arabic, Flowers of Maryam and Saffron. I am drawn towards a museum, which displays old typewriters, mud pots and carts. My child points gleefully towards a century-old rusty children’s tricycle. Intricately designed Pashmina shawls and carpets light up the dusty streets of Al Seef. Women of various ethnicities hover around a roadside Henna artist in wonder, admiring her floral designs while awaiting their turn. Their patient men linger around with smiling lips and bored eyes. 

clouds convene 

everybody smiles 

at a toddler’s non-stop babble 

Looking Forward 

Thoughts of Singapore haunt me as I stare out of the window from my new house. I try to find the soul of the city in the scent of sand. Flashy cars try to outdo each other on roads and flyovers. Far above them are Dubai’s tall buildings. I shut my eyes tightly and imagine tall pine and maple trees in the place of skyscrapers. I replace carefully arranged flower beds with wild bushes and undo the huge mall for a small pond. 

summer heat 

a bird thirsts for rainwater 

among plastic water bottles 

The Butterfly’s Journey


The poem below has been written for Carrot Ranch Double Ennead Monthly Poetry Challenge No. 5, conducted by Colleen. This challenge starts with the double ennead of 99 syllables reduced to 48 syllables to 24 syllables to finally, a haiku (12 syllable poem).

Double ennead (6/5/11/6/5)

The pale green butterfly

seeks a pale green leaf

wanting to spread his body on his shelter

fluttering his wings and

breathing the leaf’s scent.


Breathing in a way that

only the leaf hears.

His tiny chest heaves and falls to the music

of the dark, roaring sea

and his eyes quiver.


The butterfly travels

alone to his land

of hazy dreams where he drinks from pale flowers

that has a shade of green,

the leaf unaware.


48 syllable poem (3 stanzas 4-7-5)


Pale butterfly

spreads his body on the leaf

breathing in her scent


His chest rises

to the music of the sea

as his eyes quiver


Butterfly soars

in dreams and drinks from flowers

the leaf unaware


24 syllable poem (1 stanza 6-6-6)


Pale butterfly finds home

in leaf only to chase

his unfulfilled yearning


Haiku (12 syllable)


flailing summer

he leaves life

finds home in mirage

Unremembered

I sit in the General Hospital, waiting for my turn when I hear a loud wailing. Expecting to see a child, I am shocked to see an elderly lady in a wheelchair, crying with her eyes tightly shut. I am deeply disturbed and could see that the other patients are uncomfortable too. This incident reminds me of an old cleaning lady in our condo whose eyes glistened as she told me how lonely she felt as her children and grandchildren lived far away. There is another instance of a man in our neighborhood who is dreadfully scared of dogs but has to walk his daughter’s dog, as she is too busy to do so. As I walk away from the hospital, I see an elderly man staring into space.

His treble

the language

of wrinkles

The Wooden Chair in CHO

Hi Friends,

The Wooden Chair was the first haibun I had written. This was published in Contemporary Haibun Online’s July issue, 2013, Vol 9. Please find below.

My Wooden Chair

I stroll restlessly in my new house as trees outside are being chopped for construction. Lifeless new buildings are sprouting in the neighbourhood. I wonder mildly about deforestation as I lean back in my chair.

my wooden chair screeches–
memories of a
felled tree

Following the West Wind

The west wind howls in the woods, uprooting plants, tossing their nuts, and bending powerful trees. The branches nod to the teasing wind as nesting songbirds hold tight until the wind sails away.

The west wind now pauses by the pink splendor of the woods. Mesmerized, it calms into a breeze and crawls over each stem.

As the pink flowers dance in delight, the breeze finds its way to a corner, resting on an undiscovered flower. The breeze melts into the flower, enchanted by its texture and fragrance.

west wind halts

to trace each pattern

in a pecan leaf